fbpx

Join the Red White and Blue Paracord Bracelet Challenge

Operation Gratitude’s COO, retired Marine Colonel Paul Cucinotta, can make 40 paracord “survival” bracelets in one hour. Paul taught himself, because he believes in our mission, and saw firsthand the impact that Care Packages and handmade paracord survival bracelets have on our deployed Troops, Veterans, and First Responders.

By taking the time to craft a paracord bracelet, you are providing a hero with a tangible, lasting expression of your gratitude, and a symbol of the appreciation of grateful Americans everywhere. This letter, sent to us from a deployed Marine on Christmas Day 2016, shows that though a paracord bracelet may seem small, its impact is big.

As you know we have a goal to deliver 525,600 Operation Gratitude Care Packages in 2019 — one for every minute of the year. Since we include a handmade paracord bracelet in every package or pouch, that’s A LOT of paracord bracelets that we still need.

To help reach our goal, we are challenging everyone to #BeatPaul and make as many paracord bracelets as they can for our nation’s heroes around the world and here at home.

You can learn more about the 16-Day Red, White and Blue Paracord Bracelet Challenge. Join us from June 20th through July 5th and be sure to #BeatPaul.

SHAREShare on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter

RECENT ENTRIES

Channeling the Holiday Spirit this Summer

Amidst the heat of the summer, an image of logs crackling in the fireplace and casting a glow on stockings hung above is probably the last thing to come to mind for most people. But for Operation Gratitude and our growing army of volunteers nationwide, the holiday spirit is always in our thoughts.

More Than Just a Hug

When I look back at my journey over the past 3 years and 8 months as the CEO of Operation Gratitude, the one thing that sticks out the most are the hugs.

They are etched in my memory forever — literally thousands of hugs at hundreds of service projects and community-building events — on too many trips, and in too many cities to count, from sea to shining sea.